Category Archives: Photo of the Week

Photo of the Week: Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is an icon of the United States, standing in New York Harbor as a symbol of freedom and democracy. A gift from France, the Statue of Liberty commemorates their alliance with the United States during the American Revolution. The idea for the monument was proposed in 1865 by Edouard de Laboulaye,…

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Photo of the Week: Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

The Brooklyn Bridge has long been an icon of New York, so walking across it was one of the first things we did on our trip to New York City. Crossing the East River, the Brooklyn Bridge has connected the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn since it opened in 1883. Not only was it the…

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Photo of the Week: Long Room of the Old Library at Trinity College, Dublin

Not too many places in Dublin stood out for me, but one that did was the Long Room of the Old Library at Trinity College. The 65 metre long, 2-storey main chamber is lined on both sides with stalls of books- 200,000 of the oldest in the library’s collection. In between each stall on the…

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Photo of the Week: Poulnabrone Dolmen, Ireland

One of the highlights of visiting the Burren region of Ireland is seeing Poulnabrone dolmen, an outstanding Neolithic tomb and National Monument of Ireland. Over 5000 years old, this portal tomb is one of the best preserved in the country. The dolmen’s classic construction consists of a large capstone resting on top of two sets…

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Photo of the Week: Sacred Valley, Peru

The Urubamba Valley is not simply an area to travel through en route from Cusco to Machu Picchu, it’s a destination in its own right. Known as the Sacred Valley of the Incas, this scenic expanse of land is packed with archaeological sites, small villages, colourful markets and weaving communities. If an adrenaline rush is more your style, you’ll find…

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  • Jennifer J. Trego - WoW,
    What a cool place. Do have any more pics of this place?August 26, 2017 – 1:24 pmReplyCancel

Photo of the Week: San Pedro Apostol Church in Andahuaylillas, Peru

On our last day in Cusco we drove part of the Andean Baroque Route, a scenic road in the South Valley known for its four churches of the Andean Baroque artistic movement. We visited only one, San Pedro Apostol de Andahuaylillas, about 40 kms from Cusco. San Pedro Apostol may not look very grand from…

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Photo of the Week: The Twin Bays of Manzanillo

When we were in Manzanillo, Mexico, we decided to get off our resort for a few hours and do an ATV tour to the top of el Cerro del Torro (Bull Mountain). As the area’s highest mountain, it offers exquisite views of the Pacific coastline and the twin bays of Manzanillo. Bahia de Manzanillo (on…

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Photo of the Week: Toronto Skyline- View From the Toronto Islands

During our short visit to Toronto, we didn’t have a lot of time for sightseeing but there was one place I made it a priority to visit- the Toronto Islands. I knew I wanted to capture a cityscape photo of Toronto, so for that reason, we hopped on the ferry and sailed across the inner…

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  • Ray - Great shot of my hometown! Really glad you made it a priority to visit the Toronto Islands as it is hands down the best spot of the entire city of Toronto!March 3, 2017 – 3:09 pmReplyCancel

Photo of the Week: Cave and Basin, Banff National Park

Banff may be world famous for its breathtaking mountains and glistening blue lakes, but it was a small cave and its thermal waters that spurred the creation of Canada’s first national park, Banff, in 1885. Cave and Basin is the lowest of nine natural hot springs on Sulphur Mountain, its water bubbling up from 3…

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Photo of the Week: Strasbourg’s Astronomical Clock

The astronomical clock in Strasbourg Cathedral is a fine example of what can be achieved when art and science come together. Statuettes and paintings embellish a case housing clock dials and mechanisms, working together to measure time and astronomical indications. When Strasbourg’s astronomical clock was completed in 1574, it was considered to be one of…

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Photo of the Week: Sylvan Lake, Custer State Park

When we first arrived at Sylvan Lake, in South Dakota’s Custer State Park, I was shocked (in a good way) by its unique appearance. Rising up from the shore line, on two sides, were large rock formations so perfect looking, I almost didn’t think they were real. “This looks like something you’d see in a…

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  • Alouise - I saw Sylvan Lake and first thought you were talking about Sylvan Lake here in Alberta (I may have jus got home from work). Sylvan Lake in South Dakota looks pretty cool.July 26, 2016 – 12:06 amReplyCancel

    • Rhonda Krause - When we were driving around the Black Hills and I saw a sign for Sylvan Lake, I just had to go check it out to see how it compared to “our” Sylvan Lake. I think it was much more unique!July 28, 2016 – 3:14 pmReplyCancel

  • Frank - Pretty place, I always like a spot where you can climb rocks.

    Frank (bbqboy)August 4, 2016 – 2:13 amReplyCancel

Photo of the Week: Cologne Cathedral’s North Portal

Cologne Cathedral is a fine example of German Gothic architecture, famous for its extravagant architectural details. The exterior of Cologne Cathedral is heavily decorated with stone statues and delicate tracery. Every steep gable, flying buttress and lofty spire has some sort of artistic element competing for your attention. What caught my eye the most though…

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Photo of the Week: Sake Barrels at Fujiyoshida Sengen Shrine

As we travelled around Japan, I couldn’t help but notice the beautiful sake barrels that were piled on top of each other at Shinto shrines. Called kazaridaru, these “decoration barrels” are physically empty, but hold immense spiritual significance. Sake (Japanese rice wine) has long been an important part of Japanese culture. Traditionally, sake is seen…

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Photo of the Week: Bonnet House, Fort Lauderdale

Bonnet House is place where you can go to feel miles away from Fort Lauderdale, without ever leaving the city. This colourful, plantation-style home is surrounded by lush, sub-tropical gardens, encompassing one of South Florida’s last examples of a native barrier island habitat. Bonnet House is filled with the unique art, and whimsical treasures, of…

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Photo of the Week: Castillo de San Marcos, St. Augustine

As a lover of historic architecture, I couldn’t pass through St. Augustine without stopping at Castillo de San Marcos. The fort is not only the oldest structure in St. Augustine (over 300 years), it’s also the oldest masonry fort in the continental United States. Castillo de San Marcos was built in 1695 by Spain to…

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Photo of the Week: Ryozen Kannon, Kyoto

Ryozen Kannon is a temple honouring the Japanese soldiers and citizens who died during World War II. It’s located in the Higashiyama district of Kyoto and features a huge concrete statue of the Goddess of Mercy, Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (Kannon). The statue is impressive at 24 metres (80 feet) tall and 500 tonnes. Its beauty is…

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Photo of the Week: Upper Belvedere Palace, Vienna

The Belvedere was built in Vienna in the early 18th century as a summer residence for Prince Eugene of Savoy. Designed by one of Europe’s greatest Baroque architects, Johann Lucas von Hildebrandt, the complex consists of two Baroque Palaces known as the Lower and Upper Belevedere. The Upper Belvedere Palace (seen here) was completed in…

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Photo of the Week: Creek Street- Ketchikan, Alaska

A visit to Ketchikan would not be complete without a walk down the historic boardwalk of Creek Street. Creek Street is a collection of restaurants, shops, museums and private homes built on wooden pilings above the shores of Ketchikan Creek. While its colourful buildings definitely caught my eye, even more intriguing was the history of…

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Photo of the Week: Winter in Osoyoos, British Columbia

Osoyoos is primarily known as a summer destination thanks to the hot temperatures, beautiful golf courses, and vineyards and orchards that surround Canada’s warmest lake. Yet, it’s also becoming a popular winter destination among “snowbirds”, retired Canadians looking to escape to warmer climates without having to leave the country. My parents are spending winter in…

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Photo of the Week: Tybee Island Light Station

The Tybee Island Light Station is Georgia’s oldest and tallest lighthouse, at 144 feet (44 metres). Originally constructed in 1736 under the order of General James Oglethorpe, it has been rebuilt and altered several times. The version you see today was completed in 1916. The Tybee Island lighthouse is still used as a navigational aid…

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